What about Privacy?

by guest blogger Menomama3

Imagine you’ve just finished swimming laps and you’re in the shower sudsing off the chlorine. You’ve left your spectacles in the locker with your towel. You’re butt naked. You’re also pathetically myopic and directionally challenged without your glasses. Turning towards the opening that you think leads to the change room, you find yourself standing on the public deck of the pool instead.  Totally naked.  Words to describe how you feel: Exposed, embarrassed, ashamed, surprised, stunned, and vulnerable. Absolutely everything is on display. The worst of it is, when you turn to scuttle to safety, you expose yourself even further. Your hands rapidly move from one body part to another trying to cover something, anything, as you retreat.

If you’re white, pretend your mom and dad are black. Yes, you’re adopted, and when you’re in public with your family EVERYONE knows. It’s not about shame, it’s about privacy. Right away there’s a loss of privacy about your origins. And for whatever reason, interracial families draw a lot of attention when they’re out and about. Random strangers will approach and after the graceless question, “Is she yours?” ask the most shockingly rude and personal questions like, “Do you know who her real parents are?” or “How much did you pay for him?” or “Weren’t you able to have one of your own?”

We were in a bookstore. One child was still in a stroller, the other just 4 years old. I had bent down to adjust something for the baby and as I stood, the four-year old and I bashed heads by accident. I bit my tongue hard. With tears in my eyes, hanging on to the stroller, I hauled myself up and there he was, the determined stranger, striding confidently towards me with the LOOK. Through countless similar experiences, I had come to recognize the LOOK in the boldly curious. First comes the alternating eye shift from adult to child, and then back to adult again, followed by a resolute question mark posture and finally light of dawning on the face.  Please, I thought, please, just go away. But I mistook this gent. After the inevitable question – Are they yours? – he politely inquired, “Do you mind if I ask you a question?” (Internal voice – YES I MIND!)

Maybe it was because I had just chewed and chomped on my tongue and the blood crashing through my veins made me feel like I was going to explode, or perhaps it was light-headedness from standing up so quickly after the collision, or because my quickly swelling tongue made speech difficult that I turned to my daughter and said “Do you want to answer the question?” She looked down at her feet and shook her head. I pulled her close and looked at the quizzical man and gave him my best Gallic shrug. In that instant I handed my daughter control over her story. We walked away.

Have you ever met someone who tells you their life story in the first 30 minutes of meeting them, sparing no gritty details? I have two responses when this happens. Fascination and awe at their openness and then withdrawal as I hope to god they don’t want me to reciprocate.

Families love to tell stories about the day their child was born. Adoptive families like to tell the story of the day they met their child and the intense joy, happiness, (and in my case a touch of fear) that arrived wrapped up with the bundle. Yet out of the blue we don’t ask the mom sitting next to us on the bus to tell us about giving birth to her son.

For lots of reasons, adoptees have complicated responses to the telling of their story, especially as they get older. Regardless of how well the child “fits” in the family, in every adoption there is still a loss and it’s hard to articulate that with casual acquaintances. How do you explain sadness at losing a birth family, a culture, an aborted embryonic identity? Our society has lingering xenophobic beliefs and tells families like ours “Your child is so lucky to have you for a family.” (As an aside, contrast this with repeated encounters in China, when I took one of my children back for a trip, as strangers in markets would tell me how lucky I was to have her.) What child feels lucky all the time?

For nine years I was a volunteer member of a group who assembled a quarterly newsletter for a Canadian adoption agency, The Children’s Bridge. When we started this endeavour we had very young kids. We willingly shared our experiences with the adoption community. As our children grew up we started to think twice about what we were telling, recognizing that maybe we were crossing a line that our kids might not like. It seems ironic to be so concerned with over-sharing in the age of Facebook, Twitter, and the blogosphere. But everyone has a right to privacy and everyone has the right to tell their story when, if, and how they want to tell it.

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Adoptive mom to three teenage girls born in China, Menomama3 was employed for 8 years at The Children’s Bridge, an international adoption agency, working with families to facilitate adoptions from China, South Korea and Thailand. She now works for a large medical, non-profit agency and enjoys telling tales about being a middle-aged, hot-flashing mom to hormone addled teenagers.

Read the Back of the Inside Cover First: Review of “Rosie’s Family”

by Luanne

After reading the picture book Rosie’s Family: An Adoption Story by Lori Rosove, pictures by Heather Burrill, I want to scream.

Yup, scream or at least wring my hands in frustration that such a cute book by an adoption professional has some glaring “issues.”

Let me back up.  This is the story of 7-year-old Rosie, a young Beagle who was adopted by a Schnauzer family.  She has a little brother, Joey, who is the biological son of their parents.   The book is geared for the interracial adoption experience.

Welcoming and peaceful, the illustrations are drawings with colored pencils. They depict a cozy home environment, as well as some specific outdoor scenes which evoke a safe and beautiful natural world.

The book is set up to provide to an adopted child answers to her questions, affirmation for emotions she might have, and situations she might have to deal with in the outside world.  This is a very valid project, and at the end of the book are a list of issues parents can use this book to deal with.

“Rosie’s Family highlights several common issues for adoptive families.  It was written primarily as a guide for parents to discuss these issues with their children.”

If I had read this section before reading the book, I might have approached my reading differently.  Rather than being seen as a picture book for children, it might be seen as a guidebook for parents to use as the issues arise.

Here are the problems I have with the book as a “bedtime book” for children.

1.  Rosie is a dog and she was adopted by her family.  I am a huge animal lover (and, yes, I carry on conversations with my cats, interpreting their thoughts into speech).  Still, I find it awkward that the same words we use to talk about bringing specifically dogs and cats into our families (adoption, fostering) are the words we use to talk about bringing children into our families.  Sometimes we hear stories about animals adopted who “don’t work out” and are “brought back.”  Hearing these associations has got to be really puzzling for children, so to confuse the issues in a picture book seems unnecessary.  For some reason I haven’t yet identified, Rosie’s identity as a dog is more important in this book than in other picture books about adoption featuring animals which I have read in the past.

2.  There is a two page spread about where babies “come from” which is confusing.  On the left page, the text reads: “Some kids are adopted into families, like me…….”  The illustrations show a set of birth parents with baby Rosie in a basket facing the Schnauzers, Rosie’s adoptive parents.  On the right page, Rosie is looking at baby Joey inside her Mom, using a sort of telescope (microscope?).  The text reads: “…..and some are born into families, like my brother Joey who grew inside my Mom.”   Unfortunately, this contextualization makes it seem as though Rosie herself was not born.  It’s a comparison of oranges to apples.  The basic idea makes sense, but seeing it contrasted on two opposite pages gave me a strange feeling.

3.  During the questions and issues that arise (Are you my real parents? What were my birth parents like? Where did I live before? Why do I look different from my family?) I suspect that a child who has not yet encountered this breadth of adoption issues might feel overwhelmed.  Reading is frequently a time for comfort and companionship for young children, and this might be just too much all at once.  Nevertheless, as a tool to use to address an issue, it would be a decent book to pull out to illustrate a frank and loving conversation.

Rosie’s Family brings up important issues and deals with them in a trustworthy way, but it’s not bedtime reading.

Was it Enough?

Question to Parents (or Prospective Parents) in Open Adoptions:

A question was posed the other day by Tao from The Adopted Ones Blog .  How would you describe the training and focus you received from your agency on the notion of “openness”?  “Was it a one-hour class type thing – or a major focus in how it would look and ways to document it?”

If you already adopted your child or children, is the “open” part of open adoption what you expected? What you were told to expect by your agency?  Has anything surprised you?  Has it been better or more difficult than you expected?

We thought about setting this up as a poll, but really we don’t know what parameters to place.  Without hearing from you, we don’t know how good a job the agencies are doing about preparing adoptive parents for open adoptions.

Adoption and Parenting: Musing / Thruout

[Every Friday for the first two months of 2013, DWLA will feature a story from Barbara Shipka’s blog about her personal experiences with adoption and parenting.  We will sample a story from each of eight categories: 1) Before; 2) In Peru; 3) We’re Home; 4) 2 – 6 years old; 5) 6 – 12 years old; 6) 12 – 18 years old; 7) 18 + years old; 8) Musing / Thruout.  Barbara’s son Michael’s video was showcased in Gifts to the World.]

The Village in Peru

Lamasby Barbara Shipka

When we were in Peru and while the judges were on strike, I had this ‘brilliant’ idea that the two of us could take a trip to San Martin, the province where Michael’s tribe lived. It’s on the east side of the high Andes, on the way to the Amazon basin. It’s jungle called ‘The Cloud Forest.’

However, I learned that it was forbidden for Michael to leave the confines of Lima. And, even before I learned this detail, given the activity of the Sendaro Luminoso (The Shining Path) and coca trafficking in that area, even if we could go, it was very strongly discouraged.

I wanted to be able to tell him about his heritage. I could find almost nothing in LIma…except a map that showed his province. (Of course, today his village has a website!)

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When Michael was about twelve we took a winter vacation to Santa Fe to visit friends who live there.

One night several people joined us for dinner. As the conversation unfolded we learned that one of the people had actually been to Michael’s village! She had been on a two-week journey to that part of Peru as part of her shamanic training.

The next day we went to visit her. We spent time looking at all of the photos she had taken while she was in the region where his village is. And we paid special attention when she showed us photos of Michael’s village. She had gone there to visit and learn from the village shamans.

Then, as we were about to leave, she gave Michael several of her photos. What a gift!

~~~~~~

Will he go back someday? We don’t know. The thinking he shares with me is about knowing it’s a small village. Everyone knows everyone else. What would be the impact on his birth mother? Did she ever even return to the village? What if a visit exposed her history unfavorably? What would he really gain?

The real territory of pain for him is in not having…or ever being able to have…ANY information about who his father is/was.

[Photos gift of visitor, collage set on photo of the surrounding cloud forest, San Martin, Peru, 1999]

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Barbara is a single mom and was in her mid-forties when she adopted her son, Michael.  He was 10 weeks old at the time. Together, they spent many months navigating through the rather overwhelming legal processes for adoption in Peru.  Today, as a junior at the University of Minnesota, Michael is majoring in Native American Studies.

For much of her career, Barbara has been an executive leadership coach and organization effective consultant for Fortune 500 companies.  Another part of her career has been working in education and with non-governmental organizations in Europe, The Middle East, Africa, and The Caribbean.  Over the last twenty years, in addition to becoming a mother, she has also become an author and artist.  You can learn more at http://www.barbarashipka.com

These blog posts are snapshots from Barbara’s collection of stories about her experiences of their life together from March 1991 to today.  Visit her blog, Adoption and Parenting, to read more of her stories.  When you arrive, click on “Label” under “Home” where you see the tabs Recent…Date…LABEL…Author.  This will rearrange the stories into 8 categories:

Categories via 'Label'

How Do We Treat Birthmothers?

by Luanne

I’m prefacing this post by saying that I’m an adoptive parent, so I can only speak from my own adoptive-parent-perspective, not that of an adoptee or a birth parent.

Back in 1986, The Child Welfare League of America adopted a resolution outlining their perspective on open adoptions.  At the end of this post, I am going to print the whole resolution as it is published on their website.  Notice that they were already advocating open adoption and that they recognized that there can be no hard and fast rule as needs of the child may differ.  But they could see that open adoption was what was going to happen and that it was in the best interests of the child.

Flash forward to today: 2013.  In the United States today open adoption is the norm.  The Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute states:

A major new report depicts just how extensively adoption in the U.S. has changed over the last several decades – from a time when it was shrouded in so much secrecy that birth and adoptive families knew nothing about each other, to a new reality today in which the vast majority of infant adoptions are “open,” meaning the two families have some level of ongoing relationship.

So I have a question.  Since open adoption is the best option in many situations, why do some birth mothers get flak from other people, even from strangers?

230px-PregnantWomanWomen no longer feel that they have to hide that they had a baby. They no longer have to shroud that part of their lives in secrecy. Yet that openness leaves them open to attack.  A birth mother in an open adoption decides to be in a transparent relationship with the child and the adoptive parents because she did what she felt was the best thing she could possibly do for her child.  This exposure can lead to private and public criticism.

If women are criticized for placing their children with well-chosen adoptive families, isn’t this related to the shunning, discrimination, and embarrassment that women were subjected to if they publicly bore a child “out of wedlock,” in mid-20th century?

Isn’t this misogyny in a new form?  How is this in the best interests of the child?

In a world closer to the ideal, pregnant women who are considering adoption for their children would get more help keeping and raising them.  This help would be financial, emotional, whatever was needed.  But until that happens, sometimes the best option is adoption.  Should birth mothers be driven back into secrecy?  Is that what is best for the children?

Adoptees, birth parents, adoptive parents, and members of society: we’re all in this together.  We’ve made great strides in the area of adoption and there are still many more to be taken.  Let’s hope they all move in a positive direction.

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Openness in Adoption by the Child Welfare League of America:

  • The agency providing adoption services should recognize the value of openness to all members of the adoption triad, but should allow determinations concerning the degree of openness in an adoption to be made by the parties to the adoption on an individualized basis.
  • Openness in adoption has the potential to benefit all members of the adoption triad. The degree of openness in the relationships between birth and adoptive families should be arrived at by mutual agreement based on a thoughtful, informed decisionmaking process by the birth parents, the prospective adoptive parents, and the child, when appropriate.
  • Decisions about the degree of openness should be based on respect for the rights of all individuals involved in an adoption.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 1.17, p.17.
  • When adoption is being considered as an option, counseling for birth mothers, birth fathers, and other family members can clarify the options within adoption and the consequences of each option. Counseling also provides an opportunity for members of the birth family to explore the various level of openness that are possible in adoption and the extent to which they may desire openness if they make the decision to place their child for adoption. In all instances, birth parents and other family members should receive counseling to help them understand the grief and loss inherent in adoption.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 2.1, p. 28.
  • The agency providing adoption services should advise birth parents who are making a plan for the adoption of their child that information related to their identities may be disclosed to the child at some point in the future.
  • Many birth parents may express an interest in having their identities disclosed to the child whom they place for adoption at the time the child reaches adulthood. The agency providing adoption services should obtain, in writing, the birth parents’ interest in having such information provided and should retain the birth parents’ written statement in the adoption record.
  • Some birth parents, at the time they make the decision to place their child for adoption, may express a desire to have their identities withheld from their child. The agency providing adoption services should advise the birth parents that under current law in all states, courts may order the opening of sealed adoption records and allow adopted adults access to identifying information.
  • Laws sealing adoption records are being re-examined in many states, and the possibility exists that adopted adults may have increased access to identifying information in the future. As a result, agencies should assist birth parents in understanding that it is not possible to assure them that their identities will be protected from the children they place for adoption.
  • The birth parents’ desire to have their identities shared or withheld from the child they placed for adoption may change over time. The agency providing adoption services should inform the birth parents that they may at any time communicate to the agency any changes in their desires in this regard.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 2.8, p. 32.
  • When appropriate, some level of contact between birth parents, other relatives, and the child after adoption should be considered. Openness after adoption, however, should not be used as an incentive to obtain the birth parents’ agreement to voluntarily relinquish the child.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 2.9, p. 34.
  • Education about and consideration of the benefits and challenges of openness in adoption should be an integral part of the home-study and preparation process for all adoptive applicants.
  • Adopted individuals, birth families, and adoptive families are best served by a process that is open, honest, and supportive of the concept that all information, including identifying information, may be shared between birth and adoptive parents. The degree of openness in any adoption should be arrived at by mutual agreement based on a thoughtful, informed decisionmaking process by the birth parents, the prospective adoptive parents, and the child, when appropriate. Educating applicants during the homestudy process about the range of openness in adoption provides them with time to explore their attitudes and possibly expand the level of openness with which they will be comfortable in adoption.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 4.12, p. 60.
  • The agency providing adoption services should support efforts to ensure that adults who were adopted have direct access to identifying information about themselves and their birth parents.
  • The prevailing legal practice in the United States prohibits adults who were adopted as children from obtaining access to their original birth certificates or to identifying information contained in their adoption records.
  • The practice of sealing records has come under scrutiny as the benefits of openness in adoption for the adopted individual, birth parents, and adoptive parents have come to be understood. The interests of adopted adults in having information about their origins have come to be recognized as having critical psychological importance as well as importance in understanding their health and genetic status. Because such information is essential to adopted adults’ identity and health needs, the agency should promote policies that provide adopted adults with direct access to identifying information.
  • This trend toward openness has already been recognized by the Indian Child Welfare Act (P.L. 95-608). Under that Act, courts must unseal records for American Indian children, on request, and provide information necessary for the adopted individual to ascertain his or her tribal affiliation and membership. Such information may include the names of the adopted child’s birth parents.Child Welfare League of America Standards of Excellence for Adoption Services, 2000. Section 6.22, p. 87.
  • All members of the adoption triad are affected by the adoption and as such should be consulted as to their desires, needs, and capacities in determining the level of openness in their particular adoption plan. To provide such opportunities agencies should make available a broad spectrum of options which may range from closed placement to open adoption. Selection and utilization of these options is dependent on the birth parent, the prospective adoptive parent, and the child if he or she is of age or ability to make such a decision.Child Welfare League of America-First Biennial Assembly Resolution, 1986. Adoption Resolution #3.

FInders Weepers

FInders Weepers.

 

This article is an adoptee “reunion” story with a sad ending.   We’ve published some happy ending stories on our blog, but please remember there are many ways a reunion can turn out.

xo

Luanne and Marisha

More performing arts . . .

Why are we making references to Shakespeare and Beckett?  If you know the two iconic lines, we suspect you’ll put two and two together.  While you ponder our vagueness, we bring your attention to some fine arts, adoptee style.

We hear that Mu Performing Art’s Yellow Fever has a number of adoptees in the cast, including Eric Sharp, who’ll be the first featured adoptee in Coffee and Conversation.

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We hear that Mixed Blood Theatre’s Elemeno Pea has at least one adoptee in the cast.

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We hear that Ten Thousand Things The Seven has at least one adoptee in the cast.

seven

And we hear that this guy is an adoptee.

 

The world is a stage indeed; me to play..?

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Small but Important Messages in Rhodes-Courter’s “Three Little Words”

by Luanne

Have you seen the “baby” photos of Latrell Higgins which have gone viral?  He’s 13 and was adopted at age ten.  As a professional photographer, his adoptive mom Kelly Higgins takes photographs of newborns, and Latrell said he wanted some baby pix of himself.  So his mom complied.  They were laughing very hard during the shoot, but the end result is a very sweet adoption announcement.  This Huffington Post article describes the story in more detail.o-KELLI-HIGGINS-570

This photo resonated with me right now because I had just finished reading Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s memoir Three Little Words, which I wrote about in last Monday’s post.  Ashley was a foster child who lived in over a dozen foster homes and a shelter.  She was abused and neglected and lost in the system.  But because she eventually got a wonderful guardian ad litem to advocate for her, she ended up in an adoptive home.

In Ashley’s story, she describes how Gay Courter, her final foster mother and eventual adoptive mother, discovered that nobody had ever read a bedtime story to 13-year-old Ashley.  After that, Gay began to read Ashley “Pat the Bunny, Goodnight Moon, and Where the Wild Things Are.”

I took special note of the book choices because when I used to teach children’s literature, the picture books I used for in-depth analysis were Goodnight Moon and Where the Wild Things Are.  What phenomenal stories to introduce to Ashley.  They both are centered on images of the moon and the mother hovering in the background of the house.  The moon can be synonymous with the mother figure.  In this way, it could be seen that the mother in the house with the child is the adoptive mother and the moon overlooking, but at a distance, is the child’s birth mother.

My point in mentioning this passage in Ashley’s book and how it connects with Latrell’s photos is that after hearing these books read to her, Ashley began babbling in baby talk and Gay responded by playing along.  Ashley declared that she wanted a baby bottle because her mother took hers away too soon.  This can also be “read” as Ashley losing her mother too soon.  Gay bought Ashley a bottle the very next day, and Ashley drank out of the bottle with relish.

I’m not a psychologist, and I’ve always pooh-poohed more “radical” ideas like the notion of taking somebody back to their babyhood.  But in Ashley’s story, she clearly initiated these actions herself, and it sounds like it was short-term, but helpful to her.

Some excellent reviews have been written about Three Little Words.  I won’t try to re-invent the wheel here, but I paid attention to some things that were mentioned almost in passing, but which I felt were important.

Another one of these passages was when Ashley went to her first event at the White House, an invitation she received from the Dave Thomas Foundation.  She was blushing with excitement and confesses “that it was as if my childish fantasies about accidentally being lost in foster care, while I was really meant for another, grander life, had come true.”  In literature, we see the “Cinderella” story being one of the most prevalent story types there is.  Harry Potter is a Cinderella character–an orphan raised by mean relatives until he goes off to Hogwarts and discovers that he is destined for greatness.  What a powerful fantasy to keep one going in the worst of times, to know that one deserves much more.

Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s book is a treasure to foster children and to a system that needs fixing so badly.  Every person who reads this book will feel a desire to advocate for these kids and to see the system change.  As a teen, Ashley herself sees the move Erin Brockovich and decides that she will be like Erin and stand up for what’s right.  She will help other children who are enmeshed in the foster care system.  Today she is a public speaker on this issue and a foster mother.

Adoption and Parenting: 18+ years old

[Every Friday for the first two months of 2013, DWLA will feature a story from Barbara Shipka’s blog about her personal experiences with adoption and parenting.  We will sample a story from each of eight categories: 1) Before; 2) In Peru; 3) We’re Home; 4) 2 – 6 years old; 5) 6 – 12 years old; 6) 12 – 18 years old; 7) 18 + years old; 8) Musing / Thruout.  Barbara’s son Michael’s video was showcased in Gifts to the World.]

Thx! Luv, M.

full moonby Barbara Shipka

It rained all day yesterday (Saturday) and was completely cloudy into the evening. Past sunset. So I didn’t even consider trying to see the Biggest Full Moon of the year.

Around 9 pm my son, Michael, and one of his friends decided to go see ‘The Avengers’ (which I just learned had the largest opening weekend box office $$ take ever).

About five minutes after he left, he sent the following text: “Big Moon out right now!”

How very sweet and thoughtful! A recognition and affirmation of my interests.

I sent a text back: “Thx! Luv, M.” Immediately after that, I grabbed my camera and went outside.

Not my best photo, for sure. But I love it as a reminder of how such a sweet moment is shared…Michael, the Moon, me. It seems that the clouds decided to part for us/me and our/my desire to see the Big Moon.

Shortly after that, the clouds returned…until now. It’s Sunday evening now and the sun has just emerged for the first time in a couple of days.

BTW, Michael thought the movie was ‘epic.’

I thought the moon was ‘epic.’

Lovely when Life offers us such sweet and effortless experiences of win/win!

[Photo by Barbara, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 5, 2012]

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Barbara is a single mom and was in her mid-forties when she adopted her son, Michael.  He was 10 weeks old at the time. Together, they spent many months navigating through the rather overwhelming legal processes for adoption in Peru.  Today, as a junior at the University of Minnesota, Michael is majoring in Native American Studies.

For much of her career, Barbara has been an executive leadership coach and organization effective consultant for Fortune 500 companies.  Another part of her career has been working in education and with non-governmental organizations in Europe, The Middle East, Africa, and The Caribbean.  Over the last twenty years, in addition to becoming a mother, she has also become an author and artist.  You can learn more at http://www.barbarashipka.com

These blog posts are snapshots from Barbara’s collection of stories about her experiences of their life together from March 1991 to today.  Visit her blog, Adoption and Parenting, to read more of her stories.  When you arrive, click on “Label” under “Home” where you see the tabs Recent…Date…LABEL…Author.  This will rearrange the stories into 8 categories:

Categories via 'Label'

San Diego Musical

Theatre Presents Kander

& Ebb’s ‘Chicago’

Come see Marisha (Liz)

FOR THE NEXT THREE WEEKENDS!!

San Diego Musical Theatre presents Kander and Ebb’s “CHICAGO,” February 15 – March 3, 2013 at The Birch North Park Theatre.

Book by Fred Ebb and Bob Fosse
Music by John Kander
Lyrics by Fred Ebb

From the San Diego Musical Theatre Facebook page

In roaring twenties Chicago, chorine Roxie Hart murders a faithless lover and convinces her hapless husband Amos to take the rap…until he finds out he’s been duped and turns on Roxie. Convicted and sent to death row, Roxie and another “Merry Murderess” Velma Kelly, vie for the spotlight and the headlines, ultimately joining forces in search of the “American Dream”: fame, fortune and acquittal. This sharp edged satire features a dazzling score that sparked immortal staging by Bob Fosse.

“A pulse racing revival that flies us right into musical heaven.” – The New York Times

We’re proud to “Razzle-Dazzle” you with San Diego Musical Theatre’s upcoming production of Kander & Ebb’s “Chicago”, February 15-March 3 at the Birch North Park Theatre! The show is Directed by Ron Kellum, Choreographed by Randy Slovacek with Musical Direction by Don LeMaster.

CHICAGO CAST
Emma Radwick as Roxie Hart – Kyra Da Costa as Velma Kelly – Robert J. Townsend as Billie Flynn – Alonzo Saunders as Mary Sunshine –

Cast also includes: Ria Carey, Marisha Castle, Chris Cortez, Alexis Henderson, Jason James, Aurore Joly, Andrew Koslow, Ariel Lowell, Mike Motroni, Marco Puente, Joshua Ross, Chuck Saculla, Jennifer Simpson, Katie Whalley, Matthew Williams

TICKET INFORMATION
Single tickets for SDMT’s production of CHICAGO are $26.00, $36.00, $46.00 and $56.00. Children 16 years and under receive a $10 discount. Seniors 65 years and older receive a $5.00 discount. Equity and Actor’s Alliance may purchase up to 2 tickets at half price. Groups of 10 or more receive a 25% discount. For individual or group tickets contact the Administrative Office at 858-560-5740 or visit SDMT online at www.sdmt.org.

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https://dontwelookalike.com/2013/02/13/2830/

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