Thanks Southwest! (Or, Representation Matters)

What a well-written adoption article.

Holding to the Ground

Woman and man checking out at department storyI have two very different stories of Southwest Airlines. In 2006, one of their employees tried to have us arrested for not having a piece of paper their Customer Service rep told me we didn’t need. (The captain intervened, got the paper, and we went home.) In 2011, they were the only airline that would allow us to change a ticket without a fee. You see, when you adopt, you don’t always know when you have to fly. That makes reservations rather difficult. We were able to book a random flight date on Southwest, the call a CSR and have her flag the tickets as “for adoption.” So, when we called to change that ticket because we had gotten a text message at 6 a.m. saying, “The baby here,” we didn’t have to pay a change fee, or the difference in fare. And when ICPC finally cleared (remind me to…

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The Pendulum Swings – Adoption comes Full Circle

The Goodbye Baby

Hollywood Adoption: Photo found on yahoo.com

When I was adopted at the end of WWII, it was top secret. A stigma, at least in my adoptive parents’ circle, was attached to not being able to give birth to your own children. Adoption was considered a last resort. It was invisible. In large measure because of celebrity adoptions, nowadays adoption has gone public. It is seen as a viable way of forming a family. In sharp contrast to the era during which I was adopted, people who adopt children are more likely to be admired than spurned.

Celebrity adoptions have helped transform attitudes toward adoption. Magazines and newspapers feature photographs of movie stars holding adopted children. Often these little ones were adopted internationally.  Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, for example, have several children of their own and three from other countries (Cambodia, Ethiopia and Vietnam). Madonna’s tots are from…

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